NBL Pride Round 2023: Cairns slams media over Pride hesitancy


An NBL club that claimed some of its players had been “disrespected” has taken its protest to the extreme by refusing to wear the Pride Round rainbow logo.

The NBL has found itself in further turmoil over its Pride Round initiative after the Cairns Taipans refused to wear the league’s rainbow logo. South-east Melbourne’s players all wore the small rainbow champions logo in the center of their jerseys during Wednesday night’s 85-80 win, but the Cairns playing group “collectively” opted out after reacting negatively to the decision by some Taiwanese. religious foundations.

The league left the decision to wear the logo up to each individual player, but the Taiwanese felt they had “no choice” after a “barrage of abuse and hurtful comments that led to people being targeted and shamed” and appealed for understanding. The Cairns group was upset that the league’s initiative had prompted some players to “get hurt”.

“This is a negative distraction from what should have been a positive experience throughout the game and we now feel that our only option as a team is to collectively retire from this season’s kit,” the club said in a statement released shortly after Wednesday night’s clash. ahead. With South East Melbourne and signed with an 11-man list of Taiwanese, read:

“This is not a reflection of our individual positions or personal views, but rather a defense of our brothers who are being disrespected and no longer feel like they have a safe space in our sport.

“Positive change requires positive action, and we believe we can protect different people and groups in our society without victimizing others in the process.

“We hope everyone will find it in their hearts to understand that.”

News Corp revealed in an exclusive report on Monday that the NBL’s celebration of the LGBTQ+ community will feature rainbow pride logos on all courts during Round 17, with players invited to wear the small icon on their jerseys and take part in awareness sessions.

Following the Taipans’ move to avoid wearing the logo, NBL owner Larry Kestelman reiterated that the league “did not mandate that our players wear the pride jersey.”

“The NBL fully respects and understands that there may be people in the community who have different views on what is conveyed through the Champion Pride Round,” Kestelman said. “If any player or team chooses not to wear the jersey, we will respect that decision.”

Earlier on Wednesday, the club criticized reports of players reluctance to wear the logo. The club believed the focus on its controversial players was a distraction from the Pride Round initiative.

“It was disappointing that instead of focusing on positive attitudes around the LGBTQ community and the initiative, some media commentary focused on players who may be conflicted due to religious beliefs or personal circumstances,” the statement said.

“The club hopes that its fan base and the wider basketball community will embrace the inclusiveness that the Pride Round constructively promotes and celebrates diversity in our society and our sport.

“We support our players and respect their choice to wear or not wear the Pride uniform this season, without judgement.”

The Thais said players, coaches, CEO Mark Beecroft, club operations and board representatives from all clubs took part in the 90-minute Pride in Sport training session.

NBL club hit out at ‘media’ over pride row

NBL club Cairns has hit out at reports some of its players may opt out of wearing the pride of the league logo on their jerseys against South East Melbourne tonight.

The club believes the focus on its struggling players has been diverted from the league’s Pride Round initiative.

News Corp, The NBL’s celebration of the LGBTQ+ community was revealed in an exclusive report on Monday During Round 17, all courts will feature rainbow pride logos and players are invited to wear the small icon on their jerseys and attend awareness sessions.

News Corp also reported that the league would not force any players to wear the logo provided by sponsor Champion, before later revealing that some Taipan players had hesitated, citing religious and personal reasons.

The Taipans released a statement ahead of their clash with South East Melbourne on Wednesday, expressing disappointment that reports of their players’ hesitation to wear the rainbow brand had detracted from the main objective of the round.

“It was disappointing that instead of focusing on positive attitudes around the LGBTQ community and the initiative, some media commentary focused on players who may be conflicted due to religious beliefs or personal circumstances,” the statement said.

“The club hopes that its fan base and the wider basketball community will embrace the inclusiveness that the Pride Round constructively promotes and celebrates diversity in our society and our sport.

“We support our players and respect their choice to wear or not wear the Pride uniform this season, without judgement.”

The Thais said players, coaches, CEO Mark Beecroft, club operations and board representatives from all clubs took part in the 90-minute Pride in Sport training session.

Coach Adam Ford has defended his charges’ freedom of choice and urged no individual to be “singled out” if they don’t comply.

Coaches urge understanding of players who waver with pride

All views Cairns Taipans as several players are struggling with the NBL’s decision to wear the Pride Round logoTaipans coach Adam Ford defended his men, while opposition mentor Simon Mitchell appealed for understanding.

News Corp revealed on Monday that some Taipan players were reluctant to wear the league’s rainbow pride symbols on their jerseys for Wednesday night’s final against the Phoenix, citing religious beliefs.

Forde said he supported the NBL’s initiative to leave the decision to wear the logo in the hands of each individual player, but defended his charges’ freedom of choice and called for no individual to be “singled out” if they don’t fit.

“It’s a great initiative by the NBL,” Ford said.

“We are about engagement and freedom of choice. live and let live.

“This is the beauty of the message. everyone has the freedom to choose to be comfortable with who they are and not be segregated or excluded because of it.”

Mitchell, whose players Mitch Crick, Ryan Brockhoff and Owen Foxwell were at the forefront of the league’s celebration of the LGBTQ+ community on Monday, said the spotlight cannot be “put on” people.

“We’re trying to get to a place in our society where we’re tolerant of each other, we care about each other, we wish the best for each other and hopefully we can help each other along the way,” Mitchell said.

“I just feel like sometimes people get to that point at different stages in their lives.

“I don’t think we can put enlightenment on people, they have to find it.

“Religion, or organized religion and the beliefs based on it, is a difficult road to navigate.

“I’m not remotely religious, but I hope we treat these players with the respect they deserve, and I hope at some point in time they realize that supporting other groups in our community doesn’t necessarily mean to you.” resume a lifestyle or give up your beliefs.

“It is to have compassion for the plight of our fellow man and to hope for the best for all.”

Round 17 courts will feature the Champion Rainbow pride logo and players can wear the logo on their playing singlets.

Mitchell revealed his side, currently sixth in the number of finals contenders, will be without injured striker Ryan Broichoff for the final two games of the season.

But the gunslinger, who strained his syringe in Sunday’s 26-point rout of Perth, could be back in the game if the Phoenix can pull it off.

“We’re in better shape than we thought but, having said that, we still don’t have him for two important games and he won’t be healthy until he qualifies,” Mitchell said.

Originally published as NBL 2023: Cairns Taipans refuse to wear rainbow logo, claim ‘hurt’ from wavering players

(tagsTo Translate)Matthew McInerney

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